Andrey Rylkov Foundation
for Health and Social Justice
Русский

Posts with tag «personal-stories» 


December 14th, 2016

«We are totally left without any financial or moral support to fight not only the epidemic, but also a government, which sabotages the health protection of their citizens».


August 22nd, 2014

If we tell other people stories we usually tell stories of our drug using participants. But today we decided to share a story of our medical volunteer Pavel. For me this story was really moving – sometimes we just take the greatness of our team members for granted and we dont notice how we change as we do our work […]


November 13th, 2013

Two nations, countless wars, two revolutions and three decades of drug addiction - recovering user Eka reveals her legacy of opiate abuse from the USSR to today


July 21st, 2013

Interviews with patients of the Yekaterinburg TB clinic which is known as "one way clinic" among its patients. Interviews were conducted in December 2012 to understand if anything had changed since 2010 when complaint was submitted to the Special Rapporteur in 2010 with regard to the alarming situation with Tuberculosis treatment in HIV positive drug dependent patients in the Tuberculosis clinic in Yekaterinburg, located at 620050, Yekaterinburg, ulitsa Kamskaya, 37.


August 1st, 2012

One of the outcomes of the war on drugs is that drug users are treated as outcasts who are denied their basic rights. They have nowhere to turn for help. And those who are supposed to be protecting them--our so-called “law enforcement” officers--rape, abuse and kill them. The most vulnerable, powerless, and disparaged victims of this war are women. This is an interview with two young women from Yekaterinburg (Russia), whose drug dependency led them to do sex work. They talk about a vicious cycle that is impossible to break. And the most violent offenders are the police—those who are supposed to be looking out for our safety in the first place.


July 12th, 2012

"I dreamed of coming to Washington to speak at AIDS 2012. I had a message to deliver to those who have the financial and political means to turn the tide of the epidemic. I wanted to speak up because Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA)—the region where I live—is the only region in the world where HIV rates continue to rise while available resources for HIV prevention continue to shrink. Yet it’s not just an issue of funding or lack thereof. There is another reason—for millions of us, repressive drug policies and the stigma associated with drug use stand in the way of accessing HIV treatment and prevention. Russia’s drug users, second-class citizens in their own country, are denied basic human rights—the right to health and the right to life. The fact that Russia’s new national drug strategy through the year 2020 mentions HIV only once, while making no mention of human rights at all, is a case in point."


March 22nd, 2012

On 20 November 2008, a Russian newspaper, Novie Izvestia, reported that one of the courts in Karelia [a region in Russia's North-West] made a precedent judgment in a case to release a prisoner with a advanced AIDS due to his bad health condition. The prisoner was able to prove that he needed urgent treatment which he could only get outside prison. Many people, who read the news in the International Treatment Preparedness Coalition’s Russian listserv (ITPCru), sighed with relief: the prisoner referred to in the news, was Kostya Proletarsky


January 27th, 2012

On July 27, Togliatti NGO Project April and the city’s human rights activists will make public the situation of drug user Ivan Anoshkin. Who, according to his lawyer Alexey Sibalakov, “appealed to the Ministry of Health of Samara Region requesting treatment, and the next day he was arrested for drug possession on fabricated evidence".


November 24th, 2011

A three-part documentary film from the Open Society Institute about the effect on women of the drug-related HIV epidemic in Eastern Europe. Part 1: Zina and Marina—best friends and active drug users, who are about to discover their HIV status; Part 2: Tanya--a mother of two who has transitioned into substitution treatment but whose husband continues to use drugs; Part 3: Galya--a former user who now works as a peer-to-peer outreach worker.


January 31st, 2011

It's happened! I'd been afraid it would and it has… What only yesterday seemed like a nightmare has now become real: the monster has grown and got stronger and I'm drowning in the smells and feelings of drug-induced sweat and grey ash. The self-destruction programme has kicked in big time: I'm crushed, in bits, crucified on a heroin cross and nailed to the pillar of shame with syringes. I'm afraid to sleep, afraid to wake up. I can't put on a tee shirt because my arms are a mass of fresh track marks. I'm terrified of the sticky, all-engulfing horror which is the only thing left alive in my soul. But what I fear most of all is losing my nearest and dearest: people who believe me and in me, who are suffering with me, though realising bitterly that they can't help me. I had lost my family ties, but thanks to them I realised that my dear ones are not bound by family connections, but people who were once strangers and now do everything they can to save me from myself.