Andrey Rylkov Foundation
for Health and Social Justice
Русский

Posts with tag «access-to-treatment» 


December 28th, 2016

“H.I.V. is not a personal problem, it is a social problem, and it should be solved as a social problem,” Elena Plotnikova, who works for the foundation, said as she handed out supplies. “The basic attitude of the government is: You made a bad decision and we are not going to help you.”


October 31st, 2016

“I had to abandon home, family and friends to a place where nobody was waiting for me.” Former injectable drug user Ivan spoke to me in Ukraine’s capital of Kiev late in 2014.


October 2nd, 2016

Russia’s contempt for effective drug and HIV policies is killing its citizens


September 16th, 2016

Substitution therapy for addicts is banned in Russia. Three activists are hoping to gain access to the treatment through the European court of human rights


April 19th, 2016

It is bad enough that the Russian government denies opium users one of the most effective dependency treatments – methadone. Now, Russia’s government is targeting drug users who sue for their health rights in court. Alexey Kurmanaevsky, a social worker, found this out the hard way.


August 22nd, 2015

The Moscow Times about the consequences of termination of OST programs in Crimea and about ARF work in Moscow.


May 2nd, 2015

The acticle about how Russia is trying to suppress the "methadone" applications to the ECtHR at the domestic as well as international level by mounting its pressure on the three applicants.


November 6th, 2014

What Do We Want For the Future: Presenting the Manifasto Berlin Declaration


October 29th, 2014

Anya Sarang's speech at a special session dedicated to the presentation of the Manifesto / Berlin Declaration within the first European Conference on Hepatitis C and Drug Use in Berlin.


August 21st, 2014

"Even if the Russian government wakes up and finally begins to really actively fight the epidemic, the effect of preventative measures will not begin to show until two or three years later, and by that time Russia will need to cure up to 1 million HIV-positive people, which requires huge resources: not only money, but also infrastructure, doctors, etc.," said Vadim Pokrovsky, director of the Federal AIDS Center.